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July 22, 2005
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Christian Erotica and Christian Porn?

Fri Jul 22, 2005, 8:46 PM
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Important NEWS for non-DeviantArt Members: DeviantArt has recently revamped its Mature Content policies a bit, in order to appease the prudes who want nothing more than to censor your internet and your art. Now, any deviation with just about any nudity in it seems to require a Mature Content filter now. This means that you, as a non-dA member, will be UNABLE to view the vast majority of the art in my Gallery. If you want to see the wallpapers and other art that contain partial or full-nudity, you must now join dA. Fortunately, itís FREE and itís EASY!

To JOIN dA for FREE, click here: Join DeviantArt NOW!

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Give me chastity and continence- but not yet! ~ Saint Augustine



At the beginning of this summer, I became involved in a most interesting forum discussion on the possibility of a new genre of art, which fuses unabashed eroticism with a Christian outlook on humanity and life. In short, I asked the DeviantArt community what it thought of the idea of producing Christian Erotica and Christian Pornography.

As you might expect, the reaction of people to this question was both highly volatile and very stimulating. If you are interested, you can read the original forum thread, here:

The Christian Erotica and Christian Porn Forum

Be forewarned, the thread is already rather lengthy, and you should probably not add anything to it unless you have a really striking or original thought! Also, be aware that the whole baby-sitting thing was pretty much a bit of impromptu role-playing by a number of bored deviants, to include myself … so don't get your panties in a knot over it!


I won't try to repeat the discussions and arguments that we enjoyed on that forum thread here in this journal. Rather, let me simply mention that I promised a number of people that I would explore this matter further in a series of deviations on the topic of Christian Erotica.

Toward an Aesthetic of Christian Erotica?

Over the next several months, I plan to do a series of deviations, mostly Political Wallpapers, that will explore the manner in which erotica and even pornography might take on a spiritual and especially a Christian voice in our modern society. Of course, these deviations will attempt to approach the question primarily by visualizing it as a matter of graphical images that, hopefully, will encourage the viewer to look at this matter from a new angle.

At first, I will attempt to visually look at the role that porn and erotica currently play in our society, for better or worse. While much erotica and all porn are, nominally at least, a product of secular society, it is a well-known fact that self-professed Christians are among the many eager consumers of such products. I certainly hope to explore the implications of that, as well.

Eventually, I will begin to ask the pointed question of whether an authentic aesthetic of Christian erotica might not emerge in our society. If so, what sorts of limits ought it to impose upon itself? What benefits might it yield to Christians, and especially to Christian couples? What dangers or threats might it pose as well?

I don't have the answers to these questions at the present time. If you have any thoughts on these matters, I would love it if you were to share them with me!

The culmination of this series, of course, should be a number of deviations that are, well, examples of genuine Christian erotica. Needless to say, the thematic limitations imposed by the anti-porn policies of DeviantArt will prevent me from actually exploring Christian Pornography on this site. But, in all honesty, that's quite alright with me, at this point in my life. As for just what form the anticipated Christian Erotica may take, I can only say that we will see what we shall see.

The Christian Erotica and Christian Porn Series:

This is where I shall list the deviations in this series, for your convenience:

Pornography and Alienation by Laurion  Erotic Redemption of the Self by Laurion


Needless to say, we're just getting started on this series!

A Bit of a Retrospective

In the past, I have already explored some peripheral aspects of this theme in some of my wallpapers and other deviations, to include these:

Hoc est enim corpus meum by Laurion  Her Secret Passion WP by Laurion

:thumb6252161:  The Temptation of Ste. Antonia by Laurion

:thumb6392881:  Chthonian Erotika: First Fruit by Laurion


As you can see, none of these deviations actually probe the potential boundaries of Christian erotica as a discrete genre. Rather, they incorporate certain tropes of eroticism into my own expressions of spirituality. Not quite the same thing, then, but perhaps useful for beginning to think about how to envision this topic, especially if it is making your head hurt a bit?

Am I Just Baiting Christians and Other People of Faith?

Some people might see this topic, and sigh with a certain sense of world-weariness, assuming that I am just out to bait people of faith. This is not the case. I myself profess to be a Christian, and I am willing share some insights into my religious background with anyone who is truly interested and asks. I am fully aware that this topic may shock the sensibilities of some Christians, and it may offend others. But I am approaching the idea of Christian erotica, and even Christian porn, with an open mind, and with what I consider to be good-will.

Here's a thought for you: the Song of Songs is an amazingly erotic and even sexually-explicit collection of love songs and poetry … and yet it is a book of the Bible. If eroticism is good enough for the Bible, then it is surely good enough for me and you!

Maybe offensiveness lies in how we, as individuals, approach the idea of Christian erotica? Here's another thought, this time from the late Pope John Paul II:

Sexual modesty cannot then in any simple way be identified with the use of clothing, nor shamelessness with the absence of clothing and total or partial nakedness. There are circumstances in which total nakedness is not immodest....Nakedness as such is not to be equated with physical shamelessness. Immodesty is only present when nakedness plays a negative role with regard to the value of the person...The human body is not in itself shameful, nor for the same reasons are sensual reactions, and human sensuality in general. Shamelessness (just like shame and modesty) is a function of the interior of the individual.


If you are offended by this topic alone, then perhaps you need to look toward yourself for the cause and the cure, and not to me? Just a thought …



To hear many religious people talk, one would think God created the torso, head, legs and arms, but the devil slapped on the genitals. ~ Don Schrader


  • Mood: Desperate
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:icondrjdmcwilliams:
drjdmcwilliams Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2012
God created us in his image; he said that our bodies are "very good"; and the first command that he gave the first man and woman was, "Be fruitful and multiply" -- or, in modern language -- "Have sex and make babies!" (The Bible, Genesis 1:27-31). Thus, human sexuality is divinely created and intended for our good. But, unfortunately, many modern church leaders have been misled into promoting the gnostic heresy that sex -- and anything else physical -- is inherently evil. That's not true. The Bible doesn't teach that.

God does set boundaries for our sex lives -- boundaries that protect us from exploitation, disease and heartbreak. For instance, God commands us to be sexually faithful to our spouses (Exodus 20:14), to abstain from premarital sex (1 Corinthians 6:18-19), and to abstain from incest, bestiality, prostitution and homosexual sodomy (Leviticus 18; Ephesians 5:5; Romans 1:18-28). Of course, in today's world, people will argue about why God set particular boundaries and whether they are still appropriate, but the Bible says, "The secret things belong to the Lord our God, and the other things that he reveals belong to us and to our children, so that we may do all the words of his law" (Deuteronomy 29:29). That's a fancy way for God to say, "Just trust me. I know what I'm doing. If I tell you to do something, or not to do it, I have reasons that will benefit you. Simply follow my guidance, and you'll live a happier life than you otherwise would." God's goal is not to condemn us, but to make us prosperous, healthy and happy, because he loves us (3 John 1:2, John 3:16-17).

If we remember that, then we can find a rich field of sexual pleasure within the boundaries that God has set. In fact, God specifically tells us that he wants us to enjoy sexual satisfaction "at all times" (Proverbs 5:19) and that he wants us to enjoy wholesome companionship in the process (Genesis 2:18).

Thus, there is a proper place and time for "erotica" in the life of God's people (see Ecclesiastes 3:1), as reflected in the biblical Song of Solomon. That book explicitly describes all sorts of marital fondling and coupling. In fact, commentators have said that several verses describe specific sexual acts that I will leave to your imagination. Despite Solomon's explicit lyrics, his love poem is called "the song of songs" -- or "the greatest song" (Song of Solomon 1:1). In fact, Jewish commentators say that the Song of Solomon is perhaps the greatest book that God gave humanity. But we must always make sure that we keep sexuality within its proper boundaries. Solomon and his bride warn readers against stirring sexual urges prematurely, and the couple calls unrestrained sexual urges the "little foxes that spoil the vines [and] tender grapes" (Song of Solomon 2:7, 15).

Likewise, the Ten Commandments warn us against lust (covetousness), a sin that Jesus tied to committing adultery "in the heart" (Exodus 20:17; Romans 7:7; Matthew 5:27-30). Therefore, I urge writers and artists to tread carefully when dealing with sexual issues. Such issues are an important part of life, and therefore they deserve exploration in art, but please be careful to follow God's guidance, rather than lust or personal agendas.

I understand -- from experience -- the difficulty of discussing sexual issues in Christian art, because I am the author of a Christian book about overcoming sexual abuse. The book is a graphic novel -- "comic book" -- that addresses such issues from the perspective of Mary Magdalene, one of Jesus' earliest followers. My book is based on the premise that Mary Magdalene was sexually abused and prostituted by a gnostic cult of Isis worshipers before Jesus saved her and helped her regain self-respect and godly celibacy. (Ironically, although the gnostics said that physical existence is evil, they considered prostitution to be a sort of spiritual initiation.) I base my book, "Escape of the Sinful Woman," on a comparison of the Bible with many other ancient documents, including the Jewish Talmud, the writings of early "church fathers," and the writings of the gnostic heretics themselves. Each page of the book has footnotes detailing my sources of information, and there is a thick bibliography at the end. I consider the Bible to be the final authority on all historical and theological topics at issue in the book. Thus far, readers have found my work informative and helpful, and readers have complimented me on the art and narrative, and readers have hopefully been drawn closer to Jesus. I thank God for that, and I pray that God will guide you in reading my work and in creating your own.

If you would like to read and support my book ministry, please check out "Escape of the Sinful Woman" at this Amazon address: [link] Please note that I offer both teen and grownup versions of the book. Neither version contains nudity or profanity, but the grownup version deals more directly with certain issues, and thus is a little more frank in certain imagery and wording. However, I strive to glorify God in both versions. Please pray that God is glorified and that readers are benefited.

May God guide and be with you.
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:iconhotmale100:
hotmale100 Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2012
Okay, here is my take on this. For a long time I had a conflict between spirituality and sexuality as a christian, and yes, struggled with porn. The thing that attracted me to porn (not perfect models, and commerial porn), was seeing people having genuine, intense, sensual and incredible pleasure sexually. Most of the time this regrettably involved people having sex outside of marriage. I really went to pray about this and felt God show me a few things that may be relevant here. But they have reeeally helped me walk in freedom from porn anyway.

1) Sex was His idea. Sexual pleasure in all its various forms was His idea and He delights in us when we enjoy it. In fact what I realised was that the sort of sexual pleasure that these "sinners" were having - and which I want - was actually (and I am not talking about violence, or degradation) a totally good thing, and God is totally positive about great sex in all its forms. He didn't invent sex to be a little bit good, but awesome. Remember that after God made man and woman he said it was "very good" and not just "good".

2) The world is screwed up and they don't understand how God's great idea - which was covernental sex. God is totally positive and enthusiastic about covernental sexual pleasure. I think God is extreme in His goodness sometimes, and I think religion has reduced our understanding of God.

3) Not only is the world messed up but religion is also messed up and has messed many of us up. Because the presiding unspoken culture in evangelical christianity is that sex is "okay" within marriage - which it is of course - and you are "allowed" to have sexual pleasure, "permitted" to, its tolerated, if you like. But intense sexual pleasure is distrusted and and you always have to be on your guard against lust and perversion in some way. We don't ahve a culture of celebration of sensual covernental pleasure. It is can be so wonderful, releasing and transcendent - soul, spirit, and body in communion with another human being who are joined in a lifelong love covernent. Its just amazing, isn't it.

In fact I believe we have incredible freedom in covernental sex and that God positively rejoices in it, not condemns us for having too much - if that makes sense.

I also believe that freedom to enjoy also applies to masturbation if you can do so without breaking covernant with your partner.


So the issue re erotica is - how do we have erotica that is pleasureable without breaking covernant in any way.

These images are very mild, I don't think they are pornographic personally. The question about where to draw the line is a personal one I guess, but I don't want the religious police deciding for me, I prefer to settle that in own heart between God and myself (and my wife).

I love that you have this debate and explore this question. Its great, don't stop!
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:iconaspersio:
Aspersio Featured By Owner Aug 25, 2009  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Christian porn/erotica/insert immoral act here is impossible, and can NOT be pursued. That is like saying you are going to pursue that 2+2 is really 5 and not 4. It is impossible and it is vanity. Do not pursue this, because you are misusing the name of God and acting like pornography is okay. It is sin. What your doing is sin, and it is contrary to the Bible. Doing this is going against God Himself, therefore making you just another person promoting pornography. It is perverse.

What you are doing is no different from people who claim to be "Christians" and going out killing innocent people in the name of Jesus. It is WRONG. Anybody who openly contradicts the scriptures, yet calls themselves Christians, are wrong. It is also those very people who made Jesus pissed off.

Don't corrupt the word "Christian" anymore than it already is.
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:iconlaurion:
Laurion Featured By Owner Aug 26, 2009
Well, I'm not so sure, to be honest. It seems that the crux of it all is whether or not you think sexuality is immoral or not. If so, that is a very gnostic viewpoint, and runs up against some core Christian values about life. If not, then is it possible that we are confusing modesty for morality? It is this line between modesty (a purely cultural, temporal value) and morality (a value grounded in theological virtues) that I am most interested in exploring.

Don't forget that there is already a considerable amount of erotica and raw sexuality in the Scriptures, starting of course with the Song of Solomon and ranging to some gross excesses such as in Ezekiel. I really sense this is not so simple an issue as the preachers would have us believe.
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:iconaspersio:
Aspersio Featured By Owner Aug 26, 2009  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Don't be foolish. Song of Songs is showing the intimacy that comes with the commitment of marriage! You are really taking it out of context by even attempting to compare it with explicit images that only promote lust, which is sin. You don't see any spiritual man who walks with God, go have sex in public for all to see. Unless you want to take things out of context even more, and say Absalom was a great man of God.

The intimacy of sex (within marriage) is NOT meant to be broadcasted so everyone can just lust over it.

Was it not "lust" that caused the inevitable corruption within the people of Sodom and Gomorrah? The people became so entangled in sin, they began to rape anything they saw. That is NOT GOD. WAKE UP.

It is not a matter of "preachers," it is a matter of picking up a Bible and reading it. I'm not here to throw religion in your face, I am here to tell you that you are a walking contradiction. Do not say you are a Christian, if you are doing the things you do. No Christian would deliberately cause others to stumble upon lust and send them spiraling into an immoral lifestyle.
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:iconred-volpe:
red-volpe Featured By Owner Aug 18, 2009
I'm sorry, but on the thread, you say one thing, but then you say another. for instance, first you say you want to explore the idea of Christian Erotica. then you say that ';penis' is a naughty word? and you won't say it because you are a Christian lady? I'm sorry, but this is just too contradictory and confusing for me to understand. if you could clear this matter up, please do so. I'm not trying to be mean or anything here, I'm just confused.
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:iconborncrazy7189:
BornCrazy7189 Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2009
It's interesting that you bring this up (I apologize if I am replying to a very old post); even though I am a secular humanist (went through periods of henotheism, paganism, LaVeyan Satanism, and atheism), one reason why I was pushed away from religion and spirituality is because many modern religions - usually of the Abrahamic variety - and their members seem so focused on the spiritual that the needs, desires, and pleasures of the physical (i.e. sex and sensuality) are ignored or even reviled as "sinful". Being as I am that sensuality and my sexuality are deeply ingrained in who I am, not limited to a high libido, particularly for a woman... the typical "anti-earthly pleasures" and generally misogynistic attitude toward sex among the Christian community was a huge turnoff (in both ways!)

For me, I like to think that Jesus was first and foremost a man, with human desires, and I don't think it's wrong to depict him as a lover or even husband to Mary Magdalene (whom I don't think was actually a "reformed prostitute" in the sense that it is used today). (By the way if that idea appeals to you, you are more than welcome to use it). However, I am intrigued by what you may come up with, regardless of my personal "beliefs" (if you can really call them that in my case...)

Also, Pope John Paul II was a pretty amazing guy, and it would a appear, a rather progressive pope. I just wish I'd known that before he passed away.
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:iconlaurion:
Laurion Featured By Owner Jul 16, 2009
>> For me, I like to think that Jesus was first and foremost a man, with human desires, and I don't think it's wrong to depict him as a lover or even husband to Mary Magdalene <<

I think you might very much enjoy the Martin Scorsese film. "The Last Temptation of Christ." It asks the question, "what if Jesus had walked away from it all and settled down and gotten married." The answer the film comes up with is actually fairly intelligent and provocative.

FWIW, I think that a lot of the anti-physical bias of Christian spirituality is grounded in a broader Greek bias toward the spiritual that was common around the time of the early Church ... the whole neo-platonic and gnostic thing is very biased against "fleshly" life and pleasure.
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:iconjpa:
jpa Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2008
i think this is a a very interesting topic you are exploring. as a man with a faith (Islam) i feel that is important for people to look at their life and their faith so I think you are raising an interesting topic and it is important to explore and talk about things people are afraid to talk about like sex. It is a shame how difficult it is to enjoy sex and have a religion.
I read the forum expecting to read interesting debate. it was sad to see most people picking on one little story and forgetting the whole point of forum and the thread yet again it only adds fuel to the fire that religious people are narrow minded. i don't believe this to be true but few people on the forum showed themselves to be open minded and willing to talk about their faith. it was a shame. hopefully you will find more people actually interested in a debate and not a fight.
oh and for the record I don;t care about what you did and I would still hire you as a babysitter :)
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:iconanonymous-benefactor:
Anonymous-benefactor Featured By Owner May 6, 2008
good point sounds like it would be interesting
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